Law School Scholarships

The University of Washington School of Law has over 70 different funding sources providing scholarships, fellowships and awards to students each year. Most scholarships are awarded primarily on the basis of financial need, however merit or other factors may be considered with regard to certain awards. To be considered for these scholarships, admitted and current students need to complete the scholarship application.

Submitting your law school application, FAFSA (if applicable) and the scholarship application ensures you will be evaluated for all available scholarships.

Bradley T. Jones Endowed Scholarship
This scholarship was established by an anonymous gift in 2004 to honor Bradley T. Jones '41, who retired from the firm, Davis, Wright, Todd, Riese & Jones (now known as Davis Wright Tremaine). Brad Jones was a former president of the Washington State Bar Association and in 1987-88, served as the president of the Washington Law School Foundation. In making the gift, the donor wrote, "For the past 60 plus years, Brad Jones has served as a role model of what a lawyer should be, in the practice, in his firm and in his community." Brad Jones died in 2005.
Burton J. Wheelon Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1990 through an estate gift of Ruth Wheelon Lothrop in memory of her predeceased husband, Burton J. Wheelon. Mr. Burton Wheelon graduated from the UW School of Law in 1923.
Carl Hansen Scholarship
This scholarship was established to help students with financial need.
Carl M. and Carolyn C. Franklin Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1998 from the trust established by Carl and Carolyn Franklin in 1978. Carl Franklin served as legal counsel of University of Southern California for many years.
Charles Z. Smith Scholarship Fund
This fund was established in 1994 by the Coalition of Black Law Students to honor Charles Z. Smith '55, who was then a justice of the Washington Supreme Court and professor emeritus of the law school. Preference will be given to African American students.
Charlotte MacDonald Malone Endowed Scholarship
In her will, Charlotte MacDonald Malone established a scholarship fund, stipulating a preference for women law students. Malone, a lifelong Seattle resident, was prompted to make this bequest, at least in part, due to her good relations with her attorneys, the late Kenneth Short '42 and Paul Cressman, Sr. '49.
Clara G. Wein/Sororia Alumnae Endowed Scholarship
When Clara Wein, the last living charter member of Sororia-a club for UW women graduates and students-died in 1959, she bequeathed her estate to the organization. In 1987, this endowment was established through the sale of Sororia's assets, with the intention of benefiting multiple units at the UW. Clara Wein attended law school in the days of Dean John T. Condon. In recognition of her interest in the law, a portion of this endowment income is awarded to law students.
Clarence H. Campbell Law Scholarship
Clarence Hugh Campbell was born in 1903, in Superior, Wisconsin. Moving from Wisconsin when he was young, he was a resident of Seattle for 96 years. He graduated of Queen Ann High School, the University of Washington and the University of Washington School of Law. While in the University and law school, he spent summers driving a bus for tourists at Yellowstone Park, drove a gasoline truck in California, worked as an inspector for road building projects in Hamilton, Montana and worked for the U. S. Bureau of Fisheries in Alaska. These summer jobs paid his way to the University and the time spent in Alaska he counted as his favorite way to spend the summer and earn money for school. He passed the Washington State Bar in 1930 and was hired by the law firm of Karr and Gregory. In 1939, at the beginning of WWII, he joined the Navy as a Lieutenant. He was sent to Whidbey Island as the Intelligence Officer there, then to the Philippines where he served as the Chief Intelligence Officer, then to San Diego until the war ended. He retired from the Navy as a Commander after 21 years of service, four years active duty and 17 years Navy reserve. He returned to Karr and Gregory law firm, eventually becoming a full partner in the firm, which today still carries the name Karr Tuttle Campbell. He was the last survivor of the three senior partners of the firm, which continues to carry the name. He practiced law until his retirement in 1975 and will be remembered for his practice of insurance law and his incredible work ethic. Upon retirement, he turned his efforts and attention to golf, gardening, the stock market and philanthropy. He passed away in March 2004, at the age of 100
The Class of 1939 Endowed Scholarship Fund
This fund has its origins in 1952, when members of the class presented the law school with a gift of $470. Thereafter, the class made annual contributions and the fund became an endowment in 1961.
The Class of 1961 Endowed Scholarship Fund
In 1965, members of the Class of 1961 began a tradition of making annual gifts to directly fund a law student scholarship. In 2001, led by the late Charles T. Cole, the Class decided to endow their class fund to commemorate their 40th anniversary reunion.
Colonel Josef and Muriel Diamond Law Student Scholarship
This endowment was established by Colonel Josef Diamond, a 1931 graduate of the University of Washington School of Law, and Mrs. Muriel Diamond in celebration of Colonel Diamond's 100th Birthday. Sadly, Colonel Diamond passed away in March 2007, 3 days shy of his 100th birthday. Josef Diamond started working for his older brother, Louis, as a teenager pumping gas into cars parked on Diamond parking lots and there he worked his way through the University of Washington Law School. In 1931 he started his law career. During World War II, he was appointed Senior Council for the US Army, serving his country with over one hundred lawyers under his command. After the war, Josef took over Diamond Parking and continued to build it while practicing law in Seattle. His law career spanned seven decades, longer than any other attorney in Washington State history
D. Wayne & Anne E. Gittinger Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2006 by Wayne and Anne E. Gittinger. Its purpose is to provide financial support over the course of three years to outstanding law students who have competed and received a letter at the varsity level in athletics at the University of Washington. Wayne and Anne Gittinger have been active volunteers for the University of Washington in addition to their financial support. Anne Gittinger attended the University and has been a member and former chair of the Tyee Board of Advisors and formerly served as a trustee for the UW Alumni Association. Wayne Gittinger, '55, '57, has also served on the Tyee Board of Advisors and also co-chaired the School of Law'scampaign to raise funds for a new building. He is a partner in the Seattle law firm, Lane Powell
David Stobaugh & Lynn Prunhuber Endowed Scholarship
This scholarship was established by a generous gift from David Stobaugh '75, a founding member of Bendich, Stobaugh & Strong, and Lynn Prunhuber '79, also of that firm who previously was a Senior Deputy Prosecutor of the Fraud Division of the King County Prosecutor's Office.
Delta Theta Phi Award
This endowment was established in 1959 by donations from members of the Delta Theta Phi International Law Fraternity. Delta Theta Phi is a professional organization dedicated to fostering the development and achievements of the legal profession. Its members include many distinguished persons in government, business, international affairs, the judiciary and in the general practice of law. Membership in Delta Theta Phi is open to all law students who possess the necessary character to work in support of the purposes of the fraternity. Awards are given each year to a second year law student member of Story Senate, Delta Theta Phi, with the highest combined first and second year law school grades
Donald D. Fleming Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2007 by Mr. Donald Fleming to assist students seeking a juris doctorate degree attend the University of Washington School of Law. Donald D. Fleming is a graduate of the University of Washington School of Law (Class of 1951). He came to the School of Law after earning his B.A. at University of Washington (Class of 1943) and serving in the US Army during World War II in Europe (Germany. France and Italy) and Asia (Japan and Southeast Asia). For more than 50 years, he practiced general law in Seattle and Bellevue. Mr. Fleming survives his wife Marjorie Kirk Fleming of 46 years
E. Michele Moquin Memorial Scholarship
Family and friends of E. Michele Moquin '75 established the fund in 1994. At the time of her death in 1989, Moquin was a member of the Law School Alumni Association board and practiced at Miller Nash. Awards from the fund benefit students representing ethnic and cultural minorities.
Eugene A. Wright Scholarship
This fund was initially conceived by a group of former clerks of Judge Eugene A. Wright '37 on the occasion of his 80th birthday in 1993. In recognition of Judge Wright's guiding hand, support and steady counsel to young lawyers and law students, the purpose of the fund is to provide an annual monetary award to an outstanding law student. Judge Wright passed away in 2002, having served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit since 1966.
Evan Inslee Scholarship Fund
When Evan Inslee '56 retired from practice in 2002, his friends and colleagues at Inslee, Best, Doezie & Ryder, P.S., a Bellevue law firm, honored him by establishing an annual scholarship in his name.
Frank E. Holman Law Student Fund
This endowment was established in 1961 by friends, family and colleagues who wished to honor Frank Ezekiel Holman (1886-1967), an attorney who after his election as president of the American Bar Association in 1948 led an effort to amend the United States Constitution to limit the power of treaties and executive agreements. Holman's work led to the Bricker Amendment. Holman was born in Sandy, Utah. He graduated from the University of Utah in 1908 and won a Rhodes Scholarship to study law at the University of Oxford. Admitted to the Washington bar in 1911 and the Utah bar in 1912, he was dean of the Utah Law School from 1913 to 1915, when he began a law practice in Salt Lake City. In 1924, he moved to Seattle, Washington, and practiced law until his retirement in 1961. Holman argued cases in state and federal courts, including the United States Supreme Court. Holman was active in legal organizations. He was president of the Seattle Bar Association in 1941 and the Washington State Bar Association in 1945. He was elected president of the American Bar Association in 1948 and traveled extensively to warn Americans of the dangers of "treaty law". In 1953, the Seattle-King County Association of Realtors awarded him their "First Citizen" award. This fund honors Frank Holman's legacy while providing scholarships to the next generation of lawyers
George Guttormsen Scholarship Fund
This fund was established in 1979 by proceeds from the dissolution of Government Employees Associated, Inc. as a memorial to George Guttormsen '31. This scholarship is for children or grandchildren of current or former federal, state, or municipal government employees, or children of military personnel or employees of any governmental entity.
Gerald and Carolyn Grinstein Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2006 by attorney Gerald Grinstein, a UW regent (1998-2004), and his wife, Lyn. It is the donors' preference that the scholarship be awarded to students who had to work during their undergraduate course of study.
Gordon A. Livengood Endowed Fund
Troubled by the passage of I-200, Gordon A. Livengood '52 created provisions in his will to establish a fund to help promote a diverse student body at the law school. Gordon Livengood was born in Walla Walla, Washington in 1921. He graduated in 1952 from the University of Washington School of Law with a J.D. degree. Mr. Livengood served as city attorney for Bothell, Washington for a number of years prior to the city adopting the city manager form of government. Livengood retired from the Kirkland firm of Livengood, Carter, Tjossem, Fitzgerald & Alskog and died in 2001.
Harold M. Tollefson Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1989 in memory of Harold M. Tollefson, by his family for "the purpose of continuing to help others in his name." Mr. Tollefson was a 1939 graduate of the University of Washington School of Law. After graduating, he was a sole practitioner in Tacoma until his death in 1985. Aside from his legal practice, Mr. Tollefson was mayor of Tacoma for three terms and served on the Tacoma city council, was a member and later president of the Directors of the Association of Washington Cities, was a member and later president of the Executive Board of the National League of Cities and was a member of the Japanese-American Mayors' Conference. In the civic arena, he was a strong supporter of urban renewal programs that led to many changes in the downtown area of Tacoma. As a member of the Freeholders Commission he helped write the charter that changed Tacoma's city government to that of a council-manager format. Mr. Tollefson served as chairman of the Armed Services Division of Pierce County/United Good Neighbors Campaign, chairman of Tacoma Chamber of Commerce Armed Forces Committee, president of the Tacoma Lion's Club, president of the Pierce County Bar Association, president of the Tacoma Little Theatre and a director (later emeritus) of the Bank of Tacoma. He passed away in 1985.
The Honorable Robert R. Beezer Term Scholarship
Robert Renaut Beezer (July 21, 1928 – March 30, 2012) was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Robert was born in Seattle, attended the University of Washington and then transferred to the University of Virginia where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1951. He served in the Marine Corps for two years and later in the Marine Corps Reserve, retiring with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1956. He was in private practice in Seattle from 1956 to 1984, serving as a Judge pro tem on the Seattle Municipal Court from 1962 to 1976. Robert was married for over 55 years and was the father of three children. The purpose of this scholarshipis to provide assistance to financially needy students who have experienced academic challenges and/or other obstacles as undergraduate students and show great promise in their legal career.
J. Shan and Lora Mullin Endowed Scholarship in Law
This endowed scholarship was created to provide financial assistance to students in the School of Law in honor of J. Shan Mullin (1934–2018). Shan was born in Bellingham, Washington, finally settling in Seattle. He graduated from Roosevelt High School in 1952 and then earned an undergraduate degree in business administration (1956) and a law degree (1958) from the University of Washington, where he met his wife, Lora “Lee” Fraser who graduated from the UW School of Nursing in 1957. Shan joined Perkins Coie as the firm's 26th attorney in 1958. A partner in the firm's business practice and the first head of its international practice, he spent almost 60 years representing clients on ventures around the world and was engaged in many significant civic and philanthropic causes throughout his life. He took great satisfaction in bringing people together to address pressing community problems and he had a gift for helping people with opposing views find common ground. Lee created this scholarship to honor Shan, who was deeply appreciative of his UW Law education and his career serving the community.
James P. Hunter Memorial Scholarship
This fund was established after the 1988 death of James P. Hunter '39, who helped build Anderson Hunter, the largest law firm in Snohomish County and known as an outstanding trial attorney. His widow, Rose Ellen Hunter, supported the fund until her passing in 2006. Recipients of this scholarship must demonstrate a capacity for trial practice.
Jeffery H. Brotman Law Student Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2008 by James Sinegal in honor of Jeff Brotman. Mr. Brotman received his Juris Doctor from the UW School of Law in 1967, is the chairman and co-founder of Costco Wholesale Corporation, a Regent of the University of Washington and a board member of the UW Foundation. This endowment supports the School of Law's priority of enrolling a richly diverse student body, while also honoring Mr. Brotman's long-standing commitment to ensuring that all deserving students have access to higher education. In 1983, Jim Sinegal and Jeff Brotman co-founded Costco Wholesale Corporation.
Joe Brotherton Scholarship Fund
In 2007, Joe '82 and Maureen Brotherton made a gift to the Washington Law School Foundation to fund an annual $5,000 scholarship for five years. The gift was made in conjunction with similar gifts the Brothertons made to other area educational institutions. Joe is the immediate past president of the Washington Law School Foundation.
Joel Benoliel Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2007 with a gift from Joel Benoliel and his wife, Maureen Benoliel. Mr. Benoliel is a native of Seattle, and graduated in 1967 from the University of Washington with a B.A. in Political Science, earneing a J.D. from the School of Law in 1971. During his years as a student at the law school, he was in need of financial aid. His ability to continue in law school depended on the availability of adequate scholarships and loans arranged for him through the law school. He has expressed gratitude both for his education at the University to which he credits much of his later success and for the financial assistance at the law school. He began his career as an attorney at MacDonald, Hoague & Bayless, a law firm in Seattle in 1971. Thereafter, he served as General Counsel to the Jack A. Benaroya Company and was active as a commercial real estate developer in the Seattle area. In 1992, Mr. Benoliel joined Costco Wholesale Corp. where he currently holds the position of Senior Vice President of Legal & Administration, Chief Legal Officer and serves as Corporate Secretary and as a member of the company's Executive Committee. Mr. Benoliel has been a dedicated supporter of the School of Law, volunteering his talents as a Trustee of the UW Law School Foundation and on various committees including the Capital Campaign committee, the Strategic Planning committee and the Dean's Advisory committee, and has a long history of financial support for the law school
John M. Davis Endowed Diversity Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2004 to honor University of Washington alumnus, John M. Davis. John M. Davis was a 1940 graduate of the University of Washington School of Law and a founding partner in the law firm now known as Davis Wright Tremaine.The firm established this endowment to commemorate John M. Davis' 90th birthday and to celebrate his accomplishments and the values that have guided his life. John Davis was appreciative of how the practice of law enriched his own life and understood that education is one of the best ways to change the world for the better
John S. Applegate Endowed Scholarship
This endowed fund was created by a bequest received in 2002 from John S. Applegate '41 of Halverson, Applegate & McDonald in Yakima. Mr. Applegate served as the president of the Law School Alumni Association in 1958-59.
Judge Henry Clay Agnew Memorial Endowment
This endowment was established in 1986 through an estate gift of Helen Agnew in honor of her husband, Judge Henry Clay Agnew. Helen Agnew was born and raised in the Midwest and while working there as a nurse, she met and married Seattle attorney Henry Agnew. The couple made their home in Seattle where Mrs. Agnew continued in the nursing profession and Mr. Agnew became a prominent judge. By establishing an endowment in the School of Law, Mrs. Agnew wished to memorialize Judge Agnew, who died in the early 1970s. Mrs. Agnew passed away in 1985
Judith E. and Arnold J. Bendich Endowed Scholarship for Law Students
Judith E. Bendich is a 1975 graduate of the School of Law. Upon graduation, she, along with two of her classmates, founded the Seattle law firm of Bendich Stobaugh & Strong. Over the years, she has been active in ACLU as well as taking a keen interest in the well being of the School of Law. She has been a board member of the Washington Law School Foundation. Her husband, Dr. Arnold J. Bendich, received his Ph.D. in microbiology from the UW in 1969 and joined the UW Botany Department as a plant molecular biologist in 1970. He is currently a professor in the University's Biology Department. In 2004 Dr. & Mrs. Bendich established this scholarship fund in their names.
King County Bar Foundation's Minority Law Student Scholarship Fund
Since 1970 the King County Bar Association, and later the King County Bar Foundation, has made an annual contribution to the UW School of Law specifically earmarked for students of color. Over the years, more minority students have benefited from the generosity of the King County Bar than any other single source.
Law School General Scholarship Fund
This endowment was initially established by a gift from the estate of Robert J. Gustafson in 1984 and supplemented over the years with gifts of other friends, faculty and students of the Law School. The fund provides scholarships to student at the University of Washington School of Law
Lehan K. Tunks Memorial Scholarship
Lehan K. Tunks served as the dean of the UW School of Law from 1963 to 1968. He is widely credited with the school's rise in national stature during that period. Upon his retirement from the faculty in 1984, his colleagues honored him with a scholarship in his name. Since his death in 1987, the fund has served as a memorial to his leadership.
Levinson and Friedman Scholarship
This scholarship is made possible by the Levinson and Friedman Fund, which supports the library and student scholarships. It was created by the firm of Levinson, Friedman, Vhugen, Duggan & Bland in 1981 after the death of Edwin J. Friedman '34, to honor his memory; and also to recognize Sam L. Levinson '25 as a founding partner.
Luvern Rieke Scholarship
Luvern V. Rieke '49 joined the law faculty in 1949 and served as acting dean during 1968-70. On the occasion of his retirement in 1987, this fund was established from proceeds from the first annual Family Law Institute, a CLE seminar. The income from this fund is awarded to students on the basis of need. Professor Rieke died in 2003.
Lyle K. Summers Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1986 as a surprise gift to Lyle K. Summers '35 from his four sons. Summers moved to eastern Washington from the Midwest in the 1920s. He practiced law in Seattle and died in 1994.
Margaret Darrow Scholarship
In 2005, the family of Margaret Darrow established this scholarship to be awarded annually to the editor-in-chief of the Washington Law Review. Margaret Darrow worked at the Law Library from 1959 until her retirement in 1989 at the age of 80. Starting in 1965, her responsibilities centered around the financial management of the WLR, working with generations of law students who served on the editorial board. She passed away in 2003.
Marie Moreau Donohoe Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1996 by an estate gift of Marie Moreau Donohoe. Born in Canada, she was the eldest of five children born to Dr. Francois Pierre Moreau and his wife Mary Ellen MacKinnon. Her primary and secondary education was completed in Hoey, Saskatchewan, Canada, where she taught for a short time. She then became a civil servant of the Saskatchewan Government and later of the wartime Canadian Government in Ottawa. Before the war ended she went to San Francisco finding a job in a shipyard. Leaving there she worked as a secretary in New Orleans. There she was married to Harry Donohoe, however, the marriage did not last. She then moved and worked in New York before being attracted to Seattle. In Seattle she was a legal secretary for a few years until her decision to become a lawyer. She graduated from the University of Washington School of Law in 1963. As a mature student in the sixties there were numerous difficulties for her to overcome but by 1964 she was in practice. She attempted in her practice to assist particularly the causes of women whom she felt were being treated inequitably. At one time she also took up the cause against absentee Landlords in Seattle. In the early eighties she was an unsuccessful candidate for judgeship in King County. Mrs. Donohoe passed away in 1990
Marjorie M. Jones Endowed Fund
For many years, Mrs. Jones annually supported a scholarship in the name of her late husband, Robert M. Jones, who served as judge on King County Superior Court from 1925 until his death in 1954. In 1982, Mrs. Jones established a gift annuity for the benefit of both law students and students in the UW School of Social Work. Mrs. Jones died in 1987 at the age of 95.
Mary Ellen Krug Memorial Scholarship Fund
This fund was first established in 1986 by the labor law sections of the American Bar and the King County Bar Associations to honor the late Mary Ellen Krug Case '43, a distinguished labor law attorney. The annual income is awarded to a third-year law student who has a demonstrated interest in labor law. In 2006, the fund received a distribution from the estate of John Case, the widower of Mary Ellen Krug Case.
Matthew Hill Scholarship Fund
This endowment was established in 1990 by the clerks of Justice Matthew Hill '17, who served four terms on the Washington State Supreme Court and was its chief justice from 1957-59. Justice Hill died in 1989 at the age of 94. Recipients of this scholarship must demonstrate a financial need and a commitment to civic or community activities.
Nelson T. Hartson Law Scholarship Fund
This scholarship is funded by a trust established in 1965 by the late Nelson T. Hartson '12 of Hogan & Hartson, an international law firm founded in Washington, DC.
Norm Maleng Memorial Scholarship
Created by family and friends of Norm Maleng, following his passing in May 2007. This scholarship will be awarded to a law student each year that is currently working or planning on a career in public service.
Olive R. Taylor Memorial Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1968 by Professor Robert L. Taylor of the law faculty in memory of his wife. Professor Taylor joined the faculty in 1941 and retired in 1969. He died in 1985.
Paul P. Ashley Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1979 to honor the memory of Paul P. Ashley, a 1925 graduate of the University of Washington Law School, who was the first editor of the Washington Law Review and a partner in the firm now known as Foster Pepper PLLC.
Philip J. Weiss Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1990 with a gift from the estate of Philip Weiss. Philip J. Weiss was one of the last pioneers of the Columbia City area, where he moved with his parents in 1905. Mr. Weiss graduated from the University of Washington School of Law in 1923 and practiced law until his retirement in 1983. His career was interrupted when he served in the United States Navy during World Wars I and II; he reached the rank of captain before leaving the Navy. He returned to law, where his practice emphasized wills, estates and probate law. He passed away in 1989
Ralph W. Johnson Endowed Scholarship for the Native American Law Center
This endowment was established in 2006 by Mrs. Anne Johnson, in honor of her late husband, Ralph W. Johnson. The purpose of this scholarship fund is to promote the legal education of a deserving Native American Law Center student. Ralph Johnson earned his B.S. in Law 1947 and his J.D. in 1949 from University of Washington as well as a Diploma in 1961 from Hague Academy of International Law, Center for Studies and Research. Professor Johnson began teaching in 1955 at the University of Washington, after spending six years in private practice. He received both Ford Foundation and NSF grants and taught as a visiting professor at Harvard and UCLA law schools. His primary interests were in natural resource and American Indian law and he served as a consultant to a number of national and international agencies and to Indian tribes. He was the Faculty Chair of the Center for Environmental Law and Policy which he created in 1993. He co-authored "Cleaning Up Europe's Waters: Economics, Management, and Policies and Felix Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law." Professor Johnson was a dedicated teacher and, in recognition of this, was awarded the Student Bar Association's "Teacher of the Year Award" for 1983–84. In June 1998, Professor Johnson received the University of Oregon's Distinguished Service Award. He was admitted to the bar in both Washington and Oregon
Ralph W. Johnson Native American Scholarship Fund
This endowment was established in 2006 by Mrs. Anne Johnson, in honor of her late husband, Ralph W. Johnson. The purpose of this scholarship fund is to promote the legal education of a deserving student. Ralph Johnson earned his B.S. in Law 1947 and his J.D. in 1949 from University of Washington as well as a Diploma in 1961 from Hague Academy of International Law, Center for Studies and Research. Professor Johnson began teaching in 1955 at the University of Washington, after spending six years in private practice. He received both Ford Foundation and NSF grants and taught as a visiting professor at Harvard and UCLA law schools. His primary interests were in natural resource and American Indian law and he served as a consultant to a number of national and international agencies and to Indian tribes. He was the Faculty Chair of the Center for Environmental Law and Policy which he created in 1993. He co-authored "Cleaning Up Europe's Waters: Economics, Management and Policies and Felix Cohen's Handbook of Federal Indian Law." Professor Johnson was a dedicated teacher and, in recognition of this, was awarded the Student Bar Association's "Teacher of the Year Award" for 1983–84. In June 1998, Professor Johnson received the University of Oregon's Distinguished Service Award. He was admitted to the bar in both Washington and Oregon
Robert C. Finley Scholarship Fund
Robert C. Finley served as justice of the Washington State Supreme Court from 1951 to his death in 1976. A number of memorial contributions were received after his death and in the 1980s, his widow and children supported the idea of endowing a fund in his name. In 1992, the children of Justice Finley decided that income generated by the fund would support a student who demonstrates both a financial need and a commitment to civic and community activities.
Robert Dodge Memorial
This endowment was established in 1980 to honor the memory of Robert G. Dodge. Robert Dodge, a respected member of the bar, passed away in Honolulu in 1979. Born in Seattle in 1915, he received degrees in government management from Denver University and business administration from the University of Idaho. He obtained his law degree from the University of Washington and came to Hawaii in 1947. He was a man of deep personal integrity and fairness, the highest standards of professional practice and fearless advocate of individual rights. He was an acknowledge expert in the fields of municipal and constitution law, he was Hawaii's most respected authority on government structure and the political and constitutional process
Robert L. and Betty B. Fletcher Scholarship Fund
Robert L. and Betty B. Fletcher Endowed Scholarship was established to honor both UW Law Professor Emeritus Robert Fletcher and his wife U.S. Circuit Court Judge Betty B. Fletcher.
Robert M. Kennan Endowed Scholarship
Dr. Elizabeth Kennan established this endowment in honor of her late husband, Robert Kennan, who graduated from the UW School of Law in 1965. Dr. Kennan served as President of Mount Holyoke College from 1978 to 1995. She earned her Ph.D. in history from the UW in 1966.
Robert S. Hunt Memorial Scholarship
When Professor Robert S. Hunt, who taught at the law school from 1966 to 1985, passed away in 1990, his wife, Mrs. Claudette Hunt, was touched by the messages she received from his former students, many of them women who credited Professor Hunt for their decisions to finish school. Established in 1994 to honor his memory, the fund gives preference to women students who are in the process of raising a family during their law school years.
Ryan Family Endowed Scholarship
This endowment was established by Joe and Kathy Ryan in 2007. Both received their undergraduate degrees from the University of Washington in 1964. Kathy was a Gamma Phi. Joe was a Phi Delta Theta and a member of the Husky football team. For the Ryans, being a Husky is truly a family affair. Kathy's grandfather graduated from the UW in 1903 and her parents, Mary Virginia McKeown and Hugh O'Neil Gavin, completed their degrees in the late 1920s. Like Joe, his brother Mike was a standout player on the Husky football team and graduated in 1967. Mike's daughter Colleen (the Ryans' niece) graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 2002. The Ryans' daughters are fourth generation alumni. Their oldest, Kathleen Ann Ryan, was a Kappa and graduated in 1990 and her husband, Kyle Enger, graduated in 1993 and was a varsity letterman in crew. The Ryans' youngest daughter, Jennifer, was a Theta and graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1994. In addition to these family members, Kathy and Joe have numerous cousins who can also count themselves as proud Huskies. The Ryans established this scholarship as a tribute to the members of their family who have attended the UW. They elected to have the scholarship support students in the School of Law in honor of Joe's distinguished legal career. He spent 27 years at O'Melveny & Myers, the last two as managing partner. He left O'Melveny & Myers to become Executive Vice President and General Counsel at Marriott International where he served for 12 years. Over the last several years, he has acted as the CEO of a small investment compnay as well as the CEO of a firm offering mediation, arbitration and consulting services. It is the Ryans' hope that this scholarship will encourage the best and brightest students, regardless of financial ability, to attend the UW School of Law
Sam L. Levinson Endowment for Student Support Scandinavian Scholarship Fund
This endowment was created in 1996 from a gift annuity made by Sam Levinson '25 in 1991. At least one-half of the income is to be distributed annually for direct student aid. Mr. Levinson founded the Seattle firm now known as Levinson Friedman P.S.
Seed Intellectual Property Law Group Founders Scholarship
Each year since 2002, the Seattle firm of Seed Intellectual Property Law Group has made an annual award to a promising student concentrating in IP law. In 2013, the firm made a new five-year commitment to provide $6,000 annually. This fund commemorates the contributions of the firm's founders, Richard W. Seed and Benjamin F. Berry, to excellence in intellectual property legal work.
Sophia and Wilbur Albright Scholarship
This scholarship is funded by the income from a trust created in 1976 by the estate of Alice I. and Edna M. Athearn in memory of their sister, Sophia Athearn Albright and her husband, J. Wilbur Albright.
Takuji Yamashita Endowed Memorial Scholarship
Takuji Yamashita, a native of Japan, was among the first students enrolled at the University of Washington School of Law. Although he had only been in the country for six years prior to entering law school, he sailed through the rigorous two-year curriculum, distinguishing himself for his skills in moot court and graduated in 1902. He later passed the bar examination. However, the laws at the time did not admit non-citizens to the bar and naturalization was not permitted for individuals of Japanese descent. Decades after his death in 1959, Yamashita's efforts became known by scholars of civil rights. On March 1, 2001, the Washington State Supreme Court posthumously admitted Takuji Yarnashita to the Washington State Bar. In recognition of Yamashita's place in the history of American civil rights, the history of the legal profession in Washington and the history of the University of Washington School of Law, his descendants expressed a desire that a scholarship fund be created in perpetuity at the School of Law, where Takuji Yamashita "had an excellent education and his spirit was celebrated." His descendents and the School wish to have the story of Takuji Yamashita remembered and hope that law students of the future will be inspired by his life's story. This fund was established in 2001 and provides support for students enrolled in the School of Law who have demonstrated a particular interest in international human and civil rights
Vivian Campbell Law Scholarship
This endowment was established in 2008 to provide assistance to financially needy Law students. The fund was created with a gift from the estate of Vivian Campbell, a 1958 sociology graduate from the University of Washington. Vivian was born in 1911, in Mabton, Washington, to Myron and Sallie Sanders Clark. The family moved when she was a child to Yakima, where she attended grammar school, and then to Seattle, where she lived the rest of her life. She was a graduate of Franklin High School and the University of Washington, where she earned a degree in Home Economics. She derived much enjoyment from volunteer work, especially at Children's Hospital in Seattle, where she made lifelong friends. Vivian was preceded in death by her husband of 58 years, Clarence H. Campbell. Clarence and Vivian were generous benefactors of the University of Washington and several other charitable organizations in Seattle. Vivian Clark Campbell passed away at the age of 96 in 2007
Wallace D. and Barbara G. Loh Endowed Fund
This endowment was established in 1991 in the names of Barbara and Wallace Loh. Wallace D. Loh was a member of the Law School faculty from 1974 through 1995 and was dean of the law school from July 1, 1990 until his departure in 1995. Barbara G. Loh received bachelor degrees in Sociology and Nursing from the University of Washington in 1971 and 1975 as well as a Master's in Nursing in 1984. She later worked as a registered nurse in the University Hospital. Wallace and Barbara Loh made this gift in thanksgiving for the treasure that the University of Washington is to the state and nation and as a commitment to its continued excellence.
Washington Chapter of the Association of Corporate Counsel (WACC) Scholarship
Washington Law School Foundation Scholarship
This fund is made possible from gifts by alumni and friends to the law school. Awards are made to law students who are in financial need.
Weston-Morrison Scholarship
Funded by a gift from Julie Weston '69 and her husband, Gerhardt Morrison, this scholarship is intended for students of color. Julie Weston served as the president of the Law School Alumni Association in the 1980s and then as the president of the Washington Law School Foundation in 1991-93. Gerhardt Morrison retired from the Seattle firm of Bogle & Gates.
William J. Steinert Memorial Scholarship
In 1965, Mrs. Augusta Steinert began making annual gifts to the law school to be awarded as a scholarship named for her husband, who had died in 1962. William J. Steinert was a judge on the King County Superior Court (1927-1932) and a Washington State Supreme Court justice (1932-1949). At her death in 1986, a bequest from her estate endowed the fund.
William L. Dwyer Jury Project Award
Established in 2004 by many who admired and respected the late Judge William L. Dwyer, the purpose of this fund is to honor Judge Dwyer's memory by promoting two important public causes that he worked for in his life: the education of young lawyers and the maintenance and support of the American jury system. Each year, a monetary award is available for the best paper on the jury system.
William Wallace Wilshire Memorial Scholarship
This endowment was established in 1948 with a gift from the estate of Fannie Belden Wilshire, to honor her late husband, William Wallace Wilshire. The fund supports students enrolled in the School of Law.

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