Stewart Jay

Photo of Stewart  Jay
Emeritus Pendleton Miller Endowed Chair of Law

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  • Mar 09, 2017

    Source: KUOW

    In what Jay calls ‘an ordinary era’, he said it would be tough to challenge the president’s determinations on immigration because the constitution allows for broad authority. (3/9/17)
  • Mar 07, 2017

    Source: KUOW

    Stewart Jay, emeritus professor of law at the University of Washington, says the new order is going to be much harder to challenge. “The president has been given tremendous latitude by various statutes over immigration and just visiting the United States,” he said. “And there’s a lot of broad authority given to the executive over national security generally as a matter of Constitutional law, so this is going to be a much harder case for the challengers to make.” (3/7/17)
  • Feb 09, 2017

    Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

    To establish standing, Mr. Jay noted, "you just have to show that there’s a concrete harm," and the states were able to do that by showing the travel ban’s impact on their colleges. The University of Washington and Washington State University each submitted declarations to the lower court that described situations where students had been unable to return to their campuses and visiting scholars had been barred from entry, and one page of the appellate judges’ 29-page ruling highlights those circumstances. (2/9/17)
  • Dec 02, 2014

    Source: Tamba Bay Times

    Shortly before Thanksgiving, a reader sent us a social media meme of the type that sends you scrambling back to your high school history textbook wondering, "Did my teacher mention this?" The meme features the following claim: "The U.S. Constitution owes its notion of democracy to the Iroquois Tribes, including freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and separation of powers in government. Only difference is the Iroquois included women and non-whites." It’s accompanied by a reproduction of Junius Brutus Stearns’ 1856 painting of the founding fathers signing the United States Constitution in 1787. (12/2/14)
  • Nov 13, 2013

    Source: The Spokesman Review

    Two Gonzaga University students disciplined for pointing a pistol at a man they suspected of attempting to force his way into their school-owned housing have sparked a national debate pitting gun rights against private property rights. (11/13/13)

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