Courses 2010 - 2011

LAW A 574 International Law

Credits: 2-4, Max 4


International law is both a substantive body of rules and an array of processes by which law is created, interpreted, and enforced. This course is designed to introduce you to both the substance and process aspects of international law. To that end, the course places particular emphasis on the decision-making mechanisms by which international law is developed and carried out, the institutions that serve as deciders, and the legal regimes that take shape as a result. The course will also consider both traditional international law doctrines and contemporary pressures on them. We will begin with the sources of international law and participants in the international system. We will next consider how the system addresses problems related to global interdependence and integration (e.g., environment, economic integration and trade, human rights, crime, climate change, oceans, etc.), and will finally turn to challenges to the international legal order, such as the use of force and conduct of war. Throughout, we will engage in critical reflection on the legitimacy, efficacy and justice of the international system as it is currently configured. Prerequisite for JD students: LAW A 508 Transnational Law; waived by instructor permission.

Winter, 4 Credit(s)

Course Sections and Instructors
Instructor(s)
Allen, Craig

Connect with us:

© Copyright 2015, All Rights Reserved University of Washington School of Law

4293 Memorial Way Northeast, Seattle, WA 98195