About the UW School of Law

Leaders for the Global Common GoodSM

Scholarly Discovery | Ethical Advocacy | Inspired Teaching | Generous Public Service

The Vision: To shape and define just and sustainable laws and policies through scholarly discovery, ethical advocacy, inspired teaching and generous public service.

The University of Washington School of Law aspires to be the best public law school in the nation and one of the world’s most respected centers for interdisciplinary legal studies.

The Mission: To serve and educate our students to be leaders for the global common good.

Read our full Vision and Identity Statement

THE SCHOOL

Our students are asked to rethink and defend their conceptions of the law and its relation to social problems. First-year students are often surprised to learn that their principal objective is not to "learn the law" but rather to develop the intellectual tools and skills necessary to work as professionals. They gain experience in analyzing cases, statutes, and other legal materials, thereby learning the structure and operation of the legal system.

Despite its status as a state university law school, we offer courses that provide a broad view of the American legal system. Although faculty members may present the Washington view on a particular issue as an illustration for a broad-ranging discussion, graduates of the school are well prepared to practice law anywhere in the United States.

OUR STUDENTS

Each fall, an entering class of about 180 J.D. students begins the study of law. The high number of applications received each year allows the School of Law to select an exceptional student body. Our students are academically sound and culturally diverse. Their educational and professional backgrounds create a stimulating intellectual atmosphere.

All students take a full-time course load; the School of Law does not have a part-time or evening division.

OUR FACULTY

The University of Washington School of Law offers a student-to-faculty ratio of 10:1.

Faculty areas of specialization include labor law, tax law, international law, environmental and water law, family law, real property law, laws concerning business organization, commercial law, constitutional law, the law of sex and race discrimination, American Indian law, intellectual property, and health law.

In addition, there are several faculty members specifically interested in questions of legal history, legal philosophy, and law and social science. These interests are reflected in the School's curriculum.

OUR LIBRARY

The Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library houses a collection of more than 650,000 volumes establishing it as one of the largest university law collections on the West Coast.

In addition to an extensive research collection, it supports the Asian Law, Sustainable International Development Law, and Tax graduate programs and serves as a federal depository for selected U.S. government documents. CD-ROM technology and full Internet accessibility is a growing part of the library's broad-based access to information resources. A highly-trained staff of 38 facilitates access to a wide variety of legal information needs and services.

Law students also have access to the seventeen other libraries of the University of Washington.

OUR FACILITIES

William H. Gates Hall opened in September 2003. The building houses classrooms, student lounge, a coffee/snack kiosk, locker areas, the Marian Gould Gallagher Law Library, and faculty, administration and student organization offices. The building itself is fully accessible to people with disabilities and is equipped with Braille identifiers.

The law school offers:

  • wireless internet access throughout the building
  • outlets in each classroom seat.
  • classrooms equipped with audio/visual equipment including CD/DVD players and recording equipment
  • podiums wired for internet access (most with built-in computers)and
  • computer labs with 28 PCs for general use.

 

 

Dean Kellye Testy talks with students and a professor in front of Gates Hall

Last updated 2/13/2014