Robert Anderson

Photo of Robert  Anderson
Director, Native American Law Center
Professor of Law

Phone: (206) 685-2861
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Curriculum Vitae | SSRN author page



  • Dec 16, 2016

    Source: The Epoch Times

    “They’ve got a whole different standard about the land and the ethics and the sacred obligation that they feel to protect it,” said Robert Anderson, law professor at the University of Washington and expert on American Indian environmental law. “They’re here to protect that for themselves today and for seven generations in the future.” (12/16/16)
  • May 09, 2016

    Source: The Seattle Times

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sided with Northwest tribes Monday in a decision to block the largest proposed bulk-shipping terminal in North America at Cherry Point. (5/9/16)
  • Apr 24, 2016

    Source: Seattle Times

    Lummi Tribe says the proposed giant Gateway coat terminal in Whatcom County — the nation’s largest — will violate fishing treaty.
    If the federal agency denies the permit on the grounds of fishing rights, it wouldn’t be the first time. “It’s fairly common,” said Robert Anderson, a University of Washington law professor who directs the school’s Native American Law Center.In 1996, the corps denied a permit for a salmon farm west of Lummi Island because it would interfere with tribe fishing rights. A federal court upheld that decision.
    When federal agencies like the corps issues permits, “they have an obligation to protect treaty resources. The corps will have to take into account whether there will be an adverse effect on Indian treaty rights,” Anderson said.
    (4/24/2016)
    (4/24/16)
  • Apr 24, 2016

    Source: New York Times

       If the federal agency denies the permit on the grounds of fishing rights, it wouldn't be the first time
       "It's fairly common," said Robert Anderson, a University of Washington law professor who directs the school's Native American Law Center. In 1996, the Corps denied a permit for salmon farm west of Lummi Island because it would interfere with tribe fishing rights. A federal court upheld that decision.
       When federal agencies like the Corps issues permits, "they have an obligation to protect treaty resources. The Corps will have to take into account whether there will be an adverse effect on Indian treaty rights," Anderson said.
    (4/24/16)

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