Mary Fan

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Henry M. Jackson Professor of Law

Phone: (206) 685-4971
Email:

Curriculum Vitae | SSRN author page



  • - Huffington Post The Los Angeles school district on Friday removed a lawyer who successfully defended it in a sexual abuse lawsuit in which he told jurors that a 14-year-old girl who had sex with a male teacher shared responsibility despite her age.

    The trial victory spared the cash-strapped district a potentially pricey verdict, but news of the trial strategy and remarks by attorney W. Keith Wyatt that it was a more dangerous decision to cross the street than to have sex with a teacher drew criticism. (11/19/14)
  • - The Wall Street Journal
    In the paper, Professor Fan argues that in order to curtail murder-suicides, we need to target people with violent histories, especially those with histories of domestic violence.
     
    Prior studies have found that intimate partner conflict and domestic violence history are major risk factors for homicide-suicides. . . .  Even perpetrators of suicide-homicides involving non-partners frequently had a history of intimate partner conflicts. . . . These findings are consistent with studies finding separation to be a risk factor for lethal violence, and a heightened risk of violence among separated women.
    (5/28/14)
  • - ABA Journal
    The Wall Street Journal Law Blog noted Binder’s proposal and that of another academic, University of Washington law professor Mary Fan.
     
    In an article (PDF) slated for publication in the Indiana Law Journal, Fan says domestic violence victims should be encouraged to seek restraining orders when police are called to the scene. She notes studies finding that intimate partner conflict and domestic violence history are major risk factors for homicide-suicides.
     
    “Though the paradigm of danger in current gun restriction debates is a heavily armed mentally ill stranger hunting in public, most firearms deaths are perpetrated at home by people the victim knows,” Fan writes.
    (5/28/14)
  • - KPLU
    Some drivers from Washington and Colorado say they're being targeted by police when they cross into Idaho.
     
    They claim it’s because their license plate shows they live two states that have legal marijuana, but that’s a hard thing to prove.
     
    At least two Washington drivers say they were pulled over in Idaho on suspicion of using marijuana. In both cases, pot was not found and they were let go.
     
    Mary Fan, a law professor at the University of Washington, says it would be really hard to prove that they were profiled because of their license plate.
    (4/16/14)

Last updated 5/5/2014