Eric Schnapper

Photo of Eric  Schnapper
Betts, Patterson & Mines P.S. Endowed Professorship in Trial Advocacy

Phone: (206) 616-3167
Email:

Curriculum Vitae |



  • - Bloomberg
    Jesse Busk spent a 12-hour shift rushing inventory through an Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) warehouse in Nevada to meet quotas. His day wasn’t over, though. After clocking out, Busk and hundreds of other workers went through an airport-style screening process, including metal detectors, to make sure they weren’t stealing from the Web retailer. Getting through the line often took as long as 25 minutes, uncompensated, he and others employed there say. “They did it on my time,” Busk, 37, of Henderson, Nevada, said in an interview. “If people are stuck in your building and they’re not allowed to leave, why don’t you go ahead and pay them?”

    Those allegations are now before the U.S. Supreme Court in a case that could help redefine companies’ reach over hourly workers. On Wednesday, the top court will hear arguments related to a suit brought by Busk seeking compensation for his time in the security lines.
    (10/6/14)
  • - Law360 A pending U.S. Supreme Court case that turns on whether former Amazon.com warehouse workers must be paid for time spent on anti-theft security screenings could invite businesses to impose “all kinds of mandatory off-the-clock work” on employees, veteran Supreme Court advocate Eric Schnapper, who represents the plaintiffs, told Law360 in a recent interview.  (9/24/14)
  • - Los Angeles Times
    Outside accountants and lawyers who reveal fraud and wrongdoing at companies are protected just as employees, the Supreme Court rules. "They are like most employees," said Eric Schnapper, a University of Washington law professor who represented the workers before the Supreme Court. "If they saw something wrong, they wanted to fix it. And they thought the higher-ups should know about it."
     
    (3/6/14)

Last updated 5/5/2014