UW School of Law > LTA Journal > Back Issues

Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts Issues

Volumes 1 - 5 were published under the journal name "Shidler Journal of Law, Commerce + Technology".

Volume 1

Issue 3 Summer 2005

ArticleTitleAuthor
9 Will Wi-Fi Make Your Private Network Public? Wardriving, Criminal and Civil Liability, and the Security Risks of Wireless Networks

abstract   full article

Anita Ramasastry, Jane K. Winn and Peter Winn
10 Safe Harbor Agreement - Boon or Bane?

abstract   full article

Sylvia Mercado Kierkegaard
11 A Few Degrees off the Mark: Miniature Missteps that Can Render the Safe Harbors of the DMCA Inaccessible

abstract   full article

Nicole J. Nyman
12 Pop Goes The Trademark? Competitive Advertising on the Internet

abstract   full article

Kendall Bodden

Issue 2 Winter 2005

ArticleTitleAuthor
5 Tax Implications of Using Out-of-State Computer Servers

abstract   full article

Paula K. Royalty
6 Tangible Cash for an Intangible Loss? Insurance Coverage for Damage or Loss of Third-Party Data

abstract   full article

Kendall Bodden
7 Risky Business: What Must Employers Do to Shield Against Liability for Employee Wrongdoings in the Internet Age?

abstract   full article

Nicole J. Nyman
8 When Invisible Electronic Ink Leaves Red Faces: Tactical, Legal and Ethical Consequences of the Failure to Remove Metadata

abstract   full article

Jembaa Cole

Issue 1 Spring 2004

ArticleTitleAuthor
1 When is a Phone Call Not a Phone Call? Legal Issues Arising From Business Use of VoIP

abstract   full article

Paula K. Royalty
2 Oops! The Legal Consequences Of and Solutions To Online Pricing Errors

abstract   full article

Benjamin Groebner
3 CAN Law Firms SPAM?

abstract   full article

Kevin Michael
4 Not Child's Play: Compliance with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Rule

The FTC regulates how Web site operators collect personal information from children based on the requirements of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). The Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU) of the Council of Better Business Bureaus has developed voluntary guidelines that businesses can use to assist them in achieving compliance with COPPA. Businesses that comply with the guidelines are deemed to be in compliance with COPPA and thus shielded from FTC sanctions. Costs of compliance may be high, so some Internet business models that target children may no longer be viable. Any business that does not target children but that collects birth date information from its customers must have a procedure for rejecting information from anyone under age thirteen.

full article

Kristin Bryant