UW School of Law > Public Service > Pro Bono Honors Program

Pro Bono Honors Program

At UW Law, we believe that members of the legal community have an obligation to help reduce barriers to access to justice. Providing high quality pro bono legal services to low-income clients and other under-represented groups is paramount. To this end, the UW Law School’s Pro Bono Honors Program encourages our law school community (students, faculty and staff) to provide pro bono legal assistance. We particularly encourage law students to pledge to provide at least 70 hours of law-related pro bono assistance by graduation. By providing training, support, resources, opportunities and leadership development to our students, the program ensures that future lawyers are prepared and ready to fulfill the promise of equal justice.


First-Time Student Participants

  • Tie your UWNet ID to a GMail account if you haven't already.
  • Register your pledge to do pro bono
  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact if you’re not sure.
  • Attend the Annual Core Competencies Training on October 12, 2013.
    Missed a training? Go to our training page for resources and podcasts.
  • Keep track of your hours (download tracking log):
    • We’ll need you to tell us if you you’re providing direct legal assistance and/or if you’ve been in a pro bono leadership role.
    • You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours (10 for 1Ls) performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Draft Essay: Write a 600-1000 word reflective essay about your pro bono work experience, observations made about the clients you’ve served or the organization you worked for and/or reflections about your professional path in public service law.
  • Certify training attendance, report hours and submit essay by Monday, April 28: Complete the online web form.

Returning Student Participants

  • Tie your UWNet ID to a GMail account if you haven't already.
  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact if you’re not sure.
  • Keep track of your hours (download tracking log):
    • We’ll need you to tell us if you you’re providing direct legal assistance and/or if you’ve been in a pro bono leadership role.
    • You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours (10 for 1Ls) performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Report hours by Monday, April 28: Complete the online web form.

Faculty and Staff

  • Make sure your pro bono work qualifies or contact if you’re not sure.
  • Keep track of your hours (download tracking log): You’ll need a minimum of 30 hours (10 for 1Ls) performed between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014.
  • Email no later than Monday, April 28 with the following:
    • Whether you are providing pro bono legal assistance or community service (for non-attorneys only)
    • A brief description of your volunteer work
    • The name of the organization
    • The approximate dates and hours of your pro bono service
Jessica Shen

[My client and I have] lived incredibly different lives, yet I've found that you can find common ground when you relate to a person as an individual rather than a ‘Person In Need’.

– Jessica Shen '15
John Marlow

I feel obligated to be aware of my duty to give back through pro bono work.

 

– John Marlow '15
Melody Young

Seeing a case successfully closed with the goal that the client had in mind, I am reminded of how important that work is, not for ourselves, but for the population we serve.

– Melody Young '14
Ryan Thomas

Volunteering has added the human element to my studies and furthered my pursuit of a career that will work for the welfare of the community.

– Ryan Thomas '15
Caitlin Evans

The pro bono work I continue to do and have completed is the highlight of my legal education.

– Caitlin Evans '15

Video: Pro Bono at UW

Video: Why Pro Bono?


For More Information

Contact: Aline Carton-Listfjeld at or (206) 616-9789

Last updated 4/14/2014