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  • - The New York Times Michael Brown’s family, on the night of the Ferguson grand jury decision, called for all police in the United States to wear body cameras. Mayor Bill de Blasio, in announcing that some of New York’s police officers would begin wearing them, said “body cameras are one of the ways to create a real sense of transparency and accountability.” And on Monday, President Obama said he would request $75 million in federal funds to distribute 50,000 body cameras to police departments nationwide, saying they would improve police relations with the public. (12/6/14)
  • - SCOTUSblog Stories from a career of Supreme Court advocacy; what one learns about necessary skills and the value of experienced counsel; and just how hard it is to explain how different Supreme Court advocacy is from anything else a lawyer does. (11/28/14)
  • - The New York Times Amateur photographers and Hollywood filmmakers turn to them for lush overhead shots. Geologists use them to look above the seas for oil-bearing rocks. Amazon executives are pushing to use them to plop packages onto doorsteps. But now drones — the unmanned flying vehicles the size of a pizza box — are also a favorite tool for more unruly groups: pranksters and troublemakers. (11/26/14)
  • - The Wall Street Journal Planned federal rules would likely preclude delivery drones being developed by Amazon.com Inc. and Google Inc., and make some other potential drone uses too expensive for small businesses, industry proponents said. The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to propose rules for commercial drones next month. (11/25/14)
  • - Concurring Opinions Below is the first installment in a multi-part series of posts on Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner. The first two installments consist of an unconventional biographical profile of the Judge. These posts will be followed by a series of posts consisting of the Judge’s candid and often unexpected responses to numerous questions I posed to him along with those of 24 noted legal figures. (11/24/14)
  • - The Nation In his speech on Thursday night announcing his latest executive action on immigration policy, President Obama took great pains to tell the country what his new immigration policy is not: it is not “amnesty,” just a way for people to avoid deportation; it is not citizenship, just work authorization; it won’t provide social welfare benefits, it will just allow employers to keep exploiting immigrant labor. (11/22/14)
  • - The National Law Journal Richard Posner, the prolific and often controversial judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, has answered more than 150 questions submitted via email by a group of legal scholars and others. His responses will appear over several days on the Concurring Opinions blog. (11/21/14)
  • - Huffington Post The Los Angeles school district on Friday removed a lawyer who successfully defended it in a sexual abuse lawsuit in which he told jurors that a 14-year-old girl who had sex with a male teacher shared responsibility despite her age.

    The trial victory spared the cash-strapped district a potentially pricey verdict, but news of the trial strategy and remarks by attorney W. Keith Wyatt that it was a more dangerous decision to cross the street than to have sex with a teacher drew criticism. (11/19/14)
  • - USA Today Consumers and lawmakers are expressing concern about privacy after Uber said it is investigating one of its executives for allegedly tracking the private travel records of a journalist without her permission. (11/19/14)
  • - SCOTUSblog From Yale to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to legal academe; the value and relation of teaching in class and arguing in court; and a focus on employment law cases. (11/19/14)
  • - NPR The election may be over, but at the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday, the justices grappled with an Alabama case that may have a big impact on the next one. The case tests what kinds of gerrymandering are and are not acceptable under the Constitution. In the past, the court has said that if the primary motive for drawing legislative lines is to limit a race's influence, that's unconstitutional — but if it's to create a partisan advantage, that's OK. The trouble is, it's often hard to tell the difference. (11/12/14)
  • - The National Law Journal Race and voting once again appeared to badly divide the U.S. Supreme Court as it struggled on Wednesday over what to do with an Alabama legislative redistricting plan challenged as an unconstitutional racial gerrymander. Read more: http://www.nationallawjournal.com/id=1202676230105/Alabama-Redistricting-Case-Divides-Supreme-Court?back=SCB#ixzz3KhOZFzBN (11/12/14)
  • - SCOTUSblog The following is a series of questions posed by Ronald Collins on the occasion of the publication of American Justice 2014: Nine Clashing Visions on the Supreme Court (University of Pennsylvania Press), by University of Baltimore law professor Garrett Epps, who is also the Supreme Court correspondent for The Atlantic Online. (11/12/14)
  • - The Washington Post In the former category, SCOTUSBlog is hosting a mini-symposium on the case, my own contribution to which is here. (Regular VC readers will recognize many of the arguments.) Other contributors, thus far, include Nicholas Bagley and Abbe Gluck, two of the more thoughtful folks on other side of this case. More will follow. (11/10/14)
  • - The New York Times LinkedIn is the industry leader in helping people make work connections. Log on, and this professional-networking site displays a sampling of “people you may know” — often including colleagues at a user’s own workplace — with whom to start hobnobbing. (11/9/14)
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