Contact: Elizabeth Coplan
University of Washington School of Law
206.369.9412
ecoplan@uw.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

May 22, 2012

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON LAW STUDENT AWARDED PRESTIGIOUS PEGGY BROWNING FELLOWSHIP

SEATTLE -- The Peggy Browning Fund has awarded a 10-week summer fellowship to Alyson Dimmitt Gnam, a first-year student at University of Washington School of Law. Ms. Dimmitt Gnam will spend the fellowship working at National Employment Law Project in Seattle, Washington. The application process is highly competitive, and the award was based on her outstanding qualifications.

In 2012 The Peggy Browning Fund will support nearly 70 public interest labor law fellowships nationwide. With more than 500 applicants from 125 participating law schools, securing a Peggy Browning Fellowship is not an easy task. Peggy Browning Fellows are distinguished students who have not only excelled in law school but who have also demonstrated their commitment to workers’ rights through their previous educational, work, volunteer and personal experiences. Alyson Dimmitt Gnam is no exception.

Alyson received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington. As a legal advocate at the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project in Seattle, she assisted low-income survivors of domestic violence in their applications for immigration relief. Alyson also conducted a study in Guatemala as a Jackson Leadership Fellow on the effects of microfinance and land ownership programs in rural indigenous communities. These experiences showed her the forces of immigration on both sides of the border and the underlying need for safe and just working conditions for immigrants in the United States.

The Peggy Browning Fund is a not for-profit organization established in memory of Margaret A. Browning, a prominent union-side attorney who was a Member of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) from 1994 until 1997. Peggy Browning Fellowships provide law students with unique, diverse and challenging work experiences fighting for social and economic justice. These experiences encourage and inspire students to pursue careers in public interest labor law.