Events

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Thursday, April 2

  • Master of Jurisprudence (MJ) Information Session

    The Master of Jurisprudence (M.J.) Program is hosting two Admissions Information Sessions on February 26 and April 2. During these sessions, we will be providing information about this innovative Masters degree program and inform candidates about the application process. If you would like to find out more about UW School of Law’s Master of Jurisprudence degree program, please join us to learn more and meet our faculty. Please RSVP below if you would like to attend. We look forward to meeting you.

    William H. Gates Hall 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

    https://www.law.washington.edu/admissions/events/MJInfoAprRSVP.aspx

Monday, April 6

  • Global Monday - Rule of Law Assistance in Indonesia

    "The Anatomy of (Indonesian) Rule of Law Assistance" Anna B. Bosch, J.D., LL.M., Ph.D. Candidate, UW Law Hosted by the Ph.D. in Law Program and the Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development The site of donor-funded rule of law (RoL) assistance delivery is host to the relationship dynamics of a complex, multi-faceted group of actors. Through the lens of principal-agent theory, Ms. Bosch introduces four case studies of RoL assistance in Indonesia: their participants, parties and projects, and a multiplicity of local actors with self-interests. In addition to donor and recipient principals (including USAID), World Bank, the Indonesian Attorney General’s Office and Supreme Court), their respective agents, and hired contractors (Chemonics, The Asia Foundation), we also see BAPPENAS (Indonesia’s National Development Planning Agency), and “reform teams” established in the Indonesian Supreme Court and Attorney General’s Office. The ‘Samaritan’s dilemma’ and other agency problems of distorted incentives and information present themselves, resulting in moral hazard and adverse selection. Ms. Bosch will suggest that, in practice, RoL assistance actors take on multiple roles simultaneously, and that differences of opinions about various parties’ roles may be a contributing factor to friction / tension between local actors when it occurs. Ms. Bosch will share data collected as part of a larger dissertation study, titled: Local Actors in Donor-Funded Rule of Law Assistance in Indonesia: Owners, Partners, Agents? Anna B. Bosch holds a degree in Journalism from Northwestern University and a J.D. from Boston University School of Law. She worked as a criminal prosecutor for King County, Washington for six years, prior to obtaining her LL.M. in Sustainable International Development at UW School of Law. During her Ph.D. studies at the UW School of Law, Ms. Bosch has given lectures for UW Law courses Law Reform in Transition Economies, and Theories and Tools for Combatting Corruption. She has worked as a researcher for The Asian Law Center at the UW School of Law and is currently a Ph.D. Candidate at the UW School of Law.

    William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

    http://www.law.washington.edu/asianlaw/scholars/globalmondays.aspx

  • Julia Wilson, Chief Executive Officer at OneJustice= Gates PSL Lunch Talk

    Julia Wilson - Gates PSL Lunch Talk There will be a limited seating lunch on Monday, April 6 for those who wish to spend more time with speaker Julia Wilson. Although, you must RSVP, this will be an informal gathering and not a formal presentation.

    115 A-B-C, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

  • Gates Public Service Law Speaker - Julia Wilson The Paradox of Civil Legal Aid: Discipline, Leadership and the Generations

    As Chief Executive Officer, Julia R. Wilson is responsible for leading OneJustice's statewide network of 100+ nonprofit legal organizations, law firms, law schools and businesses that together provide life-changing legal assistance to over 270,000 low-income Californians each year.  Julia Wilson also provides training and consulting support to the executives and boards of the legal nonprofit organizations in OneJustice's network.  Her programmatic areas of expertise include designing innovative pro bono delivery systems and building effective and engaging board governance. Julia graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with a BA in Linguistics and with honors from Stanford Law School. 

    William H. Gates Hall 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Tuesday, April 7

  • Social Justice Tuesday-Civil Rights and Labor Organizing in Farmworker Communitites in Washington State

    Please join a panel discussion on this very important and current topic. Civil Rights and Labor Organizing in Farmworker Communities in Washington State Hosted by: Immigrant Families Advocacy Project The panel will offer insight into the organization of farmworkers, becoming an activist for farmworkers rights and working with farmworker communities on various social justice issues. Panelists: •Guadalupe Gamboa is the Senior Program Officer at Oxfam and directs the US Workers Rights Program. He has previously worked as a labor organizer and farmworker attorney in Washington State. After graduating from the University of Washington and working for the national United Farm Workers in the 1970s, he helped launch the United Farm Workers of Washington State and coordinate farmworker strikes. •Allyson Dimmitt Gnam graduated from the University of Washington School of Law in 2014 and is currently an Equal Justice Works Fellow. She works to combat sexual harassment of farmworkers in Washington State by providing legal education, investigating claims of sexual harassment and assisting farmworkers to file complaints. If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu RSVP by 12:00 pm Monday, April 6, 2015.

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

Wednesday, April 8

  • Career Building Wednesdays: Public Interest Post Grad Fellowships

    Career Building Wednesdays: Public Interest Post Grad Fellowships

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

  • Kathy Ruemmler Reception

    RECEPTION REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED. YOU MAY STILL REGISTER FOR THE INTERVIEW FROM 4:00-5:30 PM UNDER THAT EVENT LISTING. Reception with Kathy Ruemmler, partner in the Litigation Department and the global Co-chair of the White Collar Defense and Investigations Practice at Latham & Watkins. Ms. Ruemmler served for more than five years in the Obama Administration, first in the Department of Justice and later as Counsel to the President. Ms. Ruemmler has built a reputation as a respected and formidable litigator with an unusual breadth of experience in crisis management, policy development and regulatory and enforcement matters. She has particular expertise in white collar criminal defense, SEC and other agency enforcement matters, congressional and internal investigations, and at trial.

    Room 115, William H. Gates Hall 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    http://engage.washington.edu/site/Calendar?id=123561&view=Detail

  • Kathy Ruemmler Presentation

    REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW CLOSED. If you have questions, please contact Beverly Sanders at bsan@uw.edu. Thank you. Kathy Ruemmler is a partner in the Litigation Department and the global Co-chair of the White Collar Defense and Investigations Practice of Latham & Watkins. Ms. Ruemmler served for more than five years in the Obama Administration, first in the Department of Justice and later as Counsel to the President. Ms. Ruemmler has built a reputation as a respected and formidable litigator with an unusual breadth of experience in crisis management, policy development and regulatory and enforcement matters. She has particular expertise in white collar criminal defense, SEC and other agency enforcement matters, congressional and internal investigations, and at trial.

    William H. Gates Hall 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM

    http://engage.washington.edu/site/Calendar?id=123561&view=Detail

  • Education Law Summit on Juvenile Justice & Education

    Education Law Summit on Juvenile Justice & Education Justice Yu and other distinguished guests will discuss the state of juvenile justice and its impact on education in Washington State.

    William H. Gates Hall 4:00 PM - 9:00 PM

  • LGBTI Rights, Violations and Health Impacts

    The spring speaker series will cover leading issues in the interdisciplinary field of global health and justice. Presentations will be given by experts in academia, government and NGOs. Topics will include LGBTI Rights, Violations and Health Impacts; global oncology and access to medicines; Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone; Ebola and quarantine; health and human rights impacts of migration in Burma; legal advocacy for pregnant women; and medical tourism. All sessions are open to the public.

    William H. Gates Hall 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Friday, April 10

  • We Robot

    Robotics is becoming a transformative technology. We Robot 2015 builds on existing scholarship exploring the role of robotics to examine how the increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield disrupts existing legal regimes or requires rethinking of various policy issues.

    If you are on the front lines of robot theory, design, or development, we hope to see you. Come join the conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.

    William H. Gates Hall All Day Event

    More Information Here

  • Admitted Students' Day

    On behalf of the Office of Admissions & Financial Aid, UW Law welcomes the admitted class of 2018.

    William H. Gates Hall 8:00 AM - 6:59 PM

  • India IP and Innovation Policies Workshop

    CASRIP and the National Bureau of Asian Research co-host a workshop on India IP and Innovation Policies with following lunch reception

    William H. Gates Hall 10:00 AM - 1:30 PM

  • Will "King v. Burwell" Kill the Affordable Care Act?

    Every Second Friday, September 2014 through June 2015, UW Law will host a CLE pairing a UW law professor with an Alaska practitioner on a topic relevant to the Alaska Bar. UW Associate Professor Sallie Sanford and Disability Law Center of Alaska Legal Director Mark Regan will discuss the context of "King v. Burwell," key legal theories the case raises, oral argument highlights, and possible consequences of a decision in favor of the challengers. Call-in will be available. 1.50 General CLE Credits are approved for in Washington State and applied for in Alaska.

    Stoel Rives, 510 L St., Suite 500, Anchorage, Alaska 2:45 PM - 4:30 PM

    Register here.

Saturday, April 11

  • We Robot

    Robotics is becoming a transformative technology. We Robot 2015 builds on existing scholarship exploring the role of robotics to examine how the increasing sophistication of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, and even to the battlefield disrupts existing legal regimes or requires rethinking of various policy issues.

    If you are on the front lines of robot theory, design, or development, we hope to see you. Come join the conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate.

    William H. Gates Hall All Day Event

    More Information Here

Monday, April 13

  • Global Monday - Law, Culture & Society: Upcoming WInLJ Articles on Papua New Guinea and South Korea

    “Putting an End to Witch Hunts in Papua New Guinea: A Promising Potion of Prevention, Protection, and Prosecution” Victoria Ainsworth, J.D. Candidate 2015, UW Law; Chief Managing Editor, Washington International Law Journal “Abandoned Babies: The Backlash of South Korea’s Special Adoption Act” Sook Kim, J.D. Candidate 2015, UW Law; Chief Translation Editor, Washington International Law Journal Hosted by the Washington International Law Journal and UW Law Global Affairs “Putting an End to Witch Hunts in Papua New Guinea: A Promising Potion of Prevention, Protection, and Prosecution” Widespread belief in mysticism, sorcery, and the occult are entrenched in the history and culture of Melanesian societies. The Sorcery Act of 1971, which outlawed black magic in Papua New Guinea, is illustrative of how indigenous beliefs of sorcery have permeated the infrastructure and laws of an entire society. By illegalizing black magic and allowing a convicted murderer to invoke the Act as a partial affirmative defense, the Sorcery Act fostered a brutal legacy of vigilantism and witch hunts in rural villages. As a result of a recent string of savage murders that were publicized by the media and condemned by the international community, Papua New Guinea repealed the Sorcery Act and reinstated the death penalty in June 2013. However, legislation addressing black magic will have little effect on the prevalence of sorcery-related violence. The root of the problem is buried not in a book of laws, but in the deepest layers of society; namely, lack of education and access to health care, the rise of HIV/AIDS, and gender discrimination. In addition to addressing these cultural problems, the Papua New Guinean government must itself investigate accusations of “witchcraft” and offer alternative, non-magical explanations for disease, misfortune, and other harms. “Abandoned Babies: The Backlash of South Korea’s Special Adoption Act” After the amendment to South Korea’s adoption law came into effect in August 2012, the number of abandoned babies has risen. The amendment (“Special Adoption Act”) created three conditions on birthparents who wish to place their child up for adoption. First, birthparents must wait at least seven days post-birth before consenting to place their child up for adoption. Second, birthparents must receive counseling on the various subsidies and resources to which they would have access, if they choose to raise the child themselves. Finally, birthparents must go through family court to place their child up for adoption, which becomes part of government records. The legislative intent was to keep children with their biological families, reduce the number of foreign adoptions, and encourage more domestic adoptions by making the adoption process more transparent and by making available necessary information. However, since the Act took effect, more infants are being abandoned, particular those born to unwed mothers. This comment examines South Korea’s Special Adoption Act in the context of the Korean culture and history, and suggests that perhaps the biggest weakness of the Act is that it attempts to keep children with their birthparents by making the adoption process more burdensome on the birthparents. Instead, perhaps the Act should resort to other more effective and permanent means, such as fighting the social stigma surrounding adoptions, children born out of wedlock, and single mothers.

    William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

    http://www.law.washington.edu/asianlaw/scholars/globalmondays.aspx

  • Documentary: The Homestretch

    Sylaw and Outlaws presents the premier of The Homestretch--a PBS documentary about homeless the experiences of homeless youth in the U.S.

    133, William H. Gates Hall 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Tuesday, April 14

  • Externship Q&A

    Do you have questions about externships? How to apply. How to register. How many credits you can earn. What you need to do to earn credit. How the seminar works if your externship is not in Seattle. Anything else. Esther Park, Director of the Externship Program, will be available on Tuesday, April 14 from 9:00a.m. to 10:30a.m. in Room 240 and on Thursday, April 16 from 10:30a.m. to Noon in Room 433 to answer your questions. These will not be formal presentations, so bring your questions and feel free to drop in any time. Please read the general information on the Externship Program website https://www.law.washington.edu/externship/default.aspx before the session. If you are not able to attend, please email extern@uw.edu with the following: -Completed Externship Application -Copy of your resume and transcript -3 or 4 times you are available in the next two weeks

    240, William H. Gates Hall 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

  • Social Justice Tuesdays-Judicial Clerkship:Myths and Facts

    Have you considered a post-graduate clerkship? Are you reluctant to apply because you may think you may not be competitive? Or it's too late? Or the application process is too difficult? If you're interested in a judicial clerkship, we want to encourage you to apply. Come hear from some of your colleagues about their path to clerkships and learn some tips for applying: Panelists: Christal Harrison, The Honorable Ronald E. Cox, Washington Court of Appeals, Division I Jacob Operskalski The Honorable Rosanna Malouf Peterson, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Washington Casey Schaub Stephen J. Dwyer, Washington Court of Appeals, Division I

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

Wednesday, April 15

  • Career Building Wednesdays: Federal Government Job Strategies

    Career Building Wednesdays: Federal Government Job Strategies

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

  • Breast Cancer: Access to Medicines and Services

    Hot Topics in Global Health and Justice: Spring Speaker Series. This speaker series will cover leading issues in the interdisciplinary field of global health and justice. Presentations will be given by experts in academia, government and NGOs. Topics will include LGBTI Rights, Violations and Health Impacts; global oncology and access to medicines; Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone; Ebola and quarantine; health and human rights impacts of migration in Burma; legal advocacy for pregnant women; and medical tourism. All sessions are open to the public.

    William H. Gates Hall 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Thursday, April 16

  • Judge Maxa - interviewing for externships at the Washington Court of Appeals Div. II

    Judge Maxa interviewing for externships at the Washington Court of Appeals, Div II,

    240, William H. Gates Hall 9:30 AM - 2:00 PM

  • Externship Q&A

    Do you have questions about externships? How to apply. How to register. How many credits you can earn. What you need to do to earn credit. How the seminar works if your externship is not in Seattle. Anything else. Esther Park, Director of the Externship Program, will be available on Tuesday, April 14 from 9:00a.m. to 10:30a.m. in Room 240 and on Thursday, April 16 from 10:30a.m. to Noon in Room 433to answer your questions. These will not be formal presentations, so bring your questions and feel free to drop in any time. Please read the general information on the Externship Program website https://www.law.washington.edu/externship/default.aspx before the session. If you are not able to attend, please email extern@uw.edu with the following: - Completed Externship Application - Copy of your resume and transcript - 3 or 4 times you are available in the next two weeks

    433, William H. Gates Hall 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

  • Office of Admissions - Spring Information Session

    Please join Assistant Director of Admissions Tony Bates for an informative look at the University of Washington School of Law application process and an overview of the outstanding opportunities students have to choose from. RSVP at: http://www.law.washington.edu/Admissions/Events/InfoRSVP.aspx

    Room 133, William H. Gates Hall 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

    http://www.law.washington.edu/Admissions/Events/InfoRSVP.aspx

Friday, April 17

  • Fair Use In The Digital Age: The Ongoing Influence of Campbell v. Acuff-Rose’s “Transformative Use Test”

    This two-day copyright conference will revisit Campbell v. Acuff-Rose (the “Pretty Woman” case) and evaluate its ongoing impact on contemporary legal debates around fair use. In the twenty years since the decision, Campbell has emerged as among the most important copyright cases to date, with a footprint that is both broad and deep. The Copyright Act gives a four-part test for determining fair use, and courts should consider all factors. But as a consequence of Campbell’s influential reasoning, many courts and commentators focus almost exclusively on the first factor, the nature of the use by the defendant, and whether the allegedly infringing work is “transformative.” This significant shift away from attention to the other factors, especially a plaintiff’s market harm under the fourth factor, has been, for some, a cause for alarm, and for others, a cause for celebration. Campbell’s influence extends well beyond the subject matter of the works at issue: a rap parody of Roy Orbison’s classic song. A broad range of artistic works, educational or informational practices, and digital technologies have been found to be “transformative” under Campbell and thus non-infringing. This conference will explore the implications and appropriate applications of the transformative use test in a world that is increasingly digital, and thus potentially full of transformative uses.

    William H. Gates Hall All Day Event

    More information here

Saturday, April 18

  • Fair Use In The Digital Age: The Ongoing Influence of Campbell v. Acuff-Rose’s “Transformative Use Test”

    This two-day copyright conference will revisit Campbell v. Acuff-Rose (the “Pretty Woman” case) and evaluate its ongoing impact on contemporary legal debates around fair use. In the twenty years since the decision, Campbell has emerged as among the most important copyright cases to date, with a footprint that is both broad and deep. The Copyright Act gives a four-part test for determining fair use, and courts should consider all factors. But as a consequence of Campbell’s influential reasoning, many courts and commentators focus almost exclusively on the first factor, the nature of the use by the defendant, and whether the allegedly infringing work is “transformative.” This significant shift away from attention to the other factors, especially a plaintiff’s market harm under the fourth factor, has been, for some, a cause for alarm, and for others, a cause for celebration. Campbell’s influence extends well beyond the subject matter of the works at issue: a rap parody of Roy Orbison’s classic song. A broad range of artistic works, educational or informational practices, and digital technologies have been found to be “transformative” under Campbell and thus non-infringing. This conference will explore the implications and appropriate applications of the transformative use test in a world that is increasingly digital, and thus potentially full of transformative uses.

    William H. Gates Hall All Day Event

    More information here

Sunday, April 19

  • Student Health Law Organization’s yearly fundraiser, Race Judicata.

    Many of you probably know of the Student Health Law Organization’s yearly fundraiser, Race Judicata. SHLO is excited to announce that this year’s race will be on April 19th! If you don’t know what Race Judicata is, it’s a fundraising event for SHLO. We raise money for a PILA grant that goes to a student whose position is health-law related. We’d love for UWHealthLaw email list members to attend this year’s event! 2015 Details: Date: April 19th, 2015 Time: 9:30 AM race time, 8:30 AM Location: Magnuson Park (7400 Sandpoint Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115) by the picnic shelters Cost: $25 for students; $30 for non-students; teams of 5 get $5 off per registration. Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1405192596456231/ To Register: http://www.active.com/seattle-wa/running/races/race-judicata-2015 Questions? Please contact Mariah Hanley, Co-President of SHLO and Race Director at mhanle20@uw.edu.

    Magnuson Park (7400 Sandpoint Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115) by the picnic shelters 8:30 AM - 2:00 PM

    http://www.active.com/seattle-wa/running/races/race-judicata-2015

Monday, April 20

  • Global Monday - The Arctic and Environmental Justice Issues

    UW Law and the UW Fulbright Chair in Arctic Studies present: “Addressing Environmental Justice Issues in the Canadian Arctic: Stewardship, Community-Driven Research and Assessing Cumulative Impacts of Hydroelectric Mega-Projects on Sea Ice Ecosystems” Joel P. Heath, 2014-15 UW Canada Fulbright Visiting Chair in Arctic Studies; Executive Director, The Arctic Eider Society Inuit and Cree communities in East Hudson Bay/James Bay have identified major concerns about impacts of hydroelectric mega-projects on winter sea ice ecosystems. This traditional knowledge has been used to develop community-driven scientific research programs engaging hunters and youth in meaningful employment using their sea ice knowledge and skills to study cumulative impacts on the marine ecosystem. This presentation will demonstrate results of ongoing programs with five communities. Dr. Heath is an accomplished academic and filmmaker with over 15 years of field experience in the Arctic. He established the Arctic Eider Society (www.arcticeider.com), a registered Canadian charity working with Inuit and Cree communities to develop capacity for community-driven research, training and education/outreach with youth and hunters. He led one of Canada’s largest and most successful International Polar Year projects, developing community research programs, educational curriculum, and directing/producing the award winning film People of a Feather (www.peopleofafeather.com). This event is sponsored by Global Mondays, UW School of Law; the Canadian Studies Center, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies (with funding from a US Department of Education, International and Foreign Language Education, Title VI grant); Arctic Law and Policy Institute, UW School of Law; and the UW Canada Fulbright Visiting Chair in Arctic Studies (supported by the UW Office of Global Affairs, the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, Social Sciences Division, College of Arts and Sciences, College of the Environment, and the Foundation for Educational Exchange Between Canada and the United States of America, Ottawa).

    William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

    http://www.law.washington.edu/asianlaw/scholars/globalmondays.aspx

Tuesday, April 21

  • Social Justice Tuesday-Homelessness in Seattle and King County: Why Haven’t We Solved This Problem?

    Homelessness in Seattle and King County: Why Haven’t We Solved This Problem? Hosted by: Center for Public Service Law Despite a robust plan to eliminate homelessness in Seattle and King County, the number of individuals who are homeless is on the rise. Join our panelists for a discussion about the current situation, to learn about the work people are doing to address the challenges and discover ways to get involved. Panelists: • Eric Dunn-Northwest Justice Project • Hannah Rosenberger-Directing Attorney, Disabled Homeless Advocacy Project, Seattle Community Law Center • Alison Eisinger, Executive Director, Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness • Kevin Duffy-Greaves,1L, Moderator If you would like lunch please RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu by 12:00 pm Monday, April 20, 2015.

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

Wednesday, April 22

  • Public Policy & Lobbying: A Conversation with Liz Berry

    Liz Berry is the Associate Director of Government Affairs and Communications at the Washington State Association for Justice. During her tenure in Washington, DC, Liz was Legislative Director for Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (AZ-08) and worked as a political consultant. Liz is the President of the National Women’s Political Caucus of Washington, the state’s only multi-partisan organization dedicated to recruiting, training and electing women to public office. Liz will be talking about her career path in politics and lobbying, and her recent work on State House Bill 1248, which would have dramatically expanded the use of our Mandatory Arbitration (MAR) system to resolve civil cases. It passed the Washington State House of Representatives with a bipartisan vote of 78-19, but died in committee in the Senate.

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

  • Litigating the Rights of Pregnant Women

    Hot Topics in Global Health and Justice: Spring Speaker Series. April 22 speaker: Sara Ainsworth, JD, Director of Legal Advocacy for National Advocates for Pregnant Women. Open to the public.

    Room 133, William H. Gates Hall 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Thursday, April 23

  • Conversations in Criminal Justice Reform

    At this event, elected Prosecutor Dan Satterberg will give a 45min speech on criminal justice. A panel of policy-level practitioners will respond to questions on the presentation, as well as anonymous questions from the audience.

    William H. Gates Hall 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Register Here!

Friday, April 24

  • Washington State Society of Health Attorneys Spring Conference

    UW Law is hosting the Washington State Society of Healthcare Attorneys’ Spring CLE. Washington State Supreme Court Justice Mary E. Fairhurst will be speaking, along with an outstanding roster of attorneys. Topics to be covered include updates in the areas of federal and state healthcare, tax and medical malpractice and how to work with the Office of Civil Rights when it comes knocking in connection with HIPAA issues. The keynote speaker is Candace BelAir, an Emmy-Award winning former CNN reporter and producer, will talk to the audience about “How to Stay Cool on the Hot Seat.” There will be also outstanding panels on “Secrets from the Plaintiff’s Bar” and “Triage for the Healthcare Lawyer”. At the end of the day, Justice Fairhurst will speak on Civility in the Legal Profession and the UW Health Law LL.M. Department will host a reception for all attendees. It is expected that registered attorneys will receive 6.5 general CLE credits and 1 ethics credit.

    William H. Gates Hall 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Monday, April 27

  • Amazon On Campus Interviews

    Amazon will be at William Gates Hall interviewing students.

    240, William H. Gates Hall 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM

  • Global Monday - Business and Human Rights

    "Corporate Respect for Human Rights in Practice: Progress, Challenges and the Road Ahead" Mark Hodge, Executive Director, Global Business Initiative on Human Rights Hosted by UW Law Graduate Program in Sustainable International Development and the Law & Business Association In the past few decades, a constellation of actors, governance mechanisms, standards and ongoing challenges has evolved to try and address the adverse impacts of economic growth and corporate activity on human rights. Since the endorsement of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in 2011, there has been increased clarity about the duties of States and responsibilities of business regarding human rights in a business context. Companies are now expected to know and show that they act with due diligence and engage in remediation in relation to adverse impacts on workers, communities and other rights-holders. The question that many ask is whether increased conceptual and normative consensus has led to better business practice and good human rights outcomes for the most vulnerable in society. This talk will seek to uncover some of the developments regarding corporate respect for human rights in practice. Question to be addressed include: What, if anything, is changing within large multi-national corporations? How doe the business and human rights agenda play out in diverse parts of the world, especially when drivers for good corporate conduct are limited? What are the key challenges and issues that require attention from states, business and civil society? Mark Hodge is Executive Director of the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights. The Global Business Initiative on Human Rights’ (GBI) is a not-for-profit organization led by a core group of 18 corporations from different industries, headquartered in diverse countries and with global operations. GBI is a recognized leader in increasing awareness and commitment among the global business community, consistent with the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. GBI’s vision is that all corporations in all parts of the world respect the dignity and rights of the people they impact and interact with. In his presentation Mr. Hodge will share from GBI’s work to advance human rights in a business context through cross-industry peer learning, outreach and capacity building, and by informing policy. Mark has been working in the field of sustainability since 1999. In recent years, his work on Business and Human Rights has been focused on trends, practices and actors in emerging and developing markets. In his role at GBI, he has been instrumental in initiating dialogue on human rights in China, the UAE and India (where he lived and worked for 4-years). Mark has worked closely with GBI members and other major companies in diverse sectors around implementation of the UN Guiding Principles, and so possesses a knowledge of strategies, tools, challenges and good practices being applied. Mark and GBI regularly engage in expert consultations and policy developments at the international and national level, with the aim of adding perspectives from business practitioners. Mark has undergone field visits, assessments, and workshops about human rights and business in a range of countries across Latin America, Asia and the Middle East.

    William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

    http://www.law.washington.edu/asianlaw/scholars/globalmondays.aspx

  • Financial Planning for Law Grads

    Financial Planning for Law Grads

    133, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

Tuesday, April 28

  • Social Justice Tuesdays: Making the Most of your Public Service/Interest Summer

    Social Justice Tuesday April 28, 2015 12:30 - 1:20 p.m. – Room 127 Making the Most of Your Public Service Experience This Summer Presenters: •Janelle Chase, 2L 1L summer:Extern, Washington State Attorney General’s Office, WISHA team in the Labor and Industries Division 2L summer: Will serve as a summer Associate at Gordon Thomas Honeywell in the plaintiff civil rights and employment practice •Victoria Clark, 3L 1L summer: The People’s Law Office Chicago, IL 2L summer:Bronx Defender Bronx, New York •Weston LeMay, 2L 1L summer:Earth Rights International, Lima, Peru 2L summer: Will intern at Earth Justice, Seattle WA •Moderator, Bruna Estrada, 1L Will work at Public Advocates in San Francisco, CA this summer Panelists will address several questions including addressing everything from getting good supervision to work attire to trouble shooting problem situations at work. Our student panelists will share tips and strategies on how you can make the most from your upcoming summer in public service. If you would like lunch RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@u.washington.edu by 12:00 pm Monday, April 27, 2014

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

Wednesday, April 29

  • Career Building Wednesdays: Public Interest Private Firms

    Public Interest Private Firms Wednesday, April 29, 2015 12:30-1:20 pm Room 127 Passionate about public interest work? • Curious about how private firm work can fit with your values? Join us for an engaging panel discussion with attorneys working for plaintiff-side public interest firms. Hear about their career paths, practice areas, commitment to social justice work and tips on how to pursue public interest opportunities in the private sector! Featuring: Linda Lillevik, Partner, Carey Lillevik, PLLC Erin Pettigrew, Associate, Breskin Johnson & Townsend PLLC Xana Moore-Wulsin, Partner, Strata Law Group Manuel (Manny) Rios, Partner, Rios & Cruz, PS RSVP via Symplicity or gatespsl@uw.edu by 12pm Tues April 28

    127, William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

  • Health and Human Rights of Migration in Myanmar

    Hot Topics in Global Health and Justice: Spring Speaker Series. April 29: Therese Caouette will speak on Health and Human Rights of Migration in Myanmar. All sessions are open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Southeast Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington.

    Room 133, William H. Gates Hall 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Thursday, April 30

  • Global Lecture - Constitutional and Rule of Law Co-operation in Europe

    "The Venice Commission - a Constitutional Emergency Service?" Professor Per Bergling, Principal Advisor on International Law, Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (on leave from Umeå University, Sweden) Hosted by UW Law Global Affairs The Venice Commission is the Council of Europe's principal instrument for engaging with member states (European and Euroasian) on constitutional and rule of law issues, including anti-corruption measures. It has been very active and successful in the Balkans, Near Asia and Hungary. Per Bergling is a Professor Law at Umeå University, Sweden (on leave). He is an international law scholar and a leading European figure in law and development. Professor Bergling currently serves as the Principal Advisor on International Law for the Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Among Bergling's responibilities with the Ministry are rule of law processes in the European Union, Council of Europe and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, as well as a range of other matters related to International Law, International Justice and Human Rights. Previously, he has worked for international and regional organizations as expert advisor in the areas of international law and rule of law, including two years as Rule of Law Advisor with the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In 2003-04, Prof. Bergling served as UW Law's inaugural Garvey Schubert Barer Visiting Professor in Asian Law.

    William H. Gates Hall 12:30 PM - 1:20 PM

    http://www.law.washington.edu/asianlaw/scholars/globalmondays.aspx

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