UW School of Law > Admissions > ABA Required Disclosures

ABA Required Disclosures Under Standard 509

The following consumer information is provided to prospective law students in accordance with American Bar Association (ABA) Section on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar Standard 509 to assist prospective students in making an informed choice about law school.

2014 ABA Standard 509 Information Report

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, data on this page was submitted to the American Bar Association in October 2014 for the 2014 reporting period.

About the University of Washington School of Law (UW Law)

Founded in 1899, the University of Washington School of Law is one of the nation's top public law schools and one of the world's most respected centers for interdisciplinary legal studies. It offers the unmatched assets of a major research university located in Seattle, a thriving city that is one of the world's leading economic and cultural hubs. The School of Law has 61 full-time faculty members and 549 J.D. students. With the favorable student-to-faculty ratio, classes are generally small, with frequent opportunities for student-teacher contact. Each first-year student attends at least one class of 30 students or fewer in addition to a small section of Legal Analysis, Research, and Writing.

Guided by what is relevant in the 21st century, the School of Law provides students with the skills that give them a competitive edge in the changing legal profession and an awareness of their ethical and public service responsibilities. The law school prepares them to be Leaders for the Global Common Good through inspired teaching, scholarly discovery, ethical advocacy, and generous public service. The school is a member of the AALS, approved by the ABA, and holds a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

  • Type of school: Public
  • Term: Quarter
  • Application deadline: March 15 (opens on October 1; rolling admission)
  • Application fee: $60
  • Financial aid deadline: submit FAFSA as soon as possible after admission; priority deadline is 2/28
  • Can first year start other than fall? No
  • Part-Time Program: No

Please note that UW Law does not offer a part-time program, an evening program of study, or online courses.

Admissions

To be considered for admissions, applicants must follow the procedures outlined in J.D. Application Procedures, register with the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and demonstrate that they have earned a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. or Canadian college or university, or the foreign equivalent whose program has been deemed comparable to that of a four-year baccalaureate degree, prior to registering for the first academic quarter at the School of Law. No specified set of undergraduate courses or major is required for admission. However, students should design an undergraduate program that enables them to develop certain skills: facility in reading, writing, and speaking the English language; a critical understanding of human values and institutions; and mastery of the ability to reason creatively and logically.

We seek to enroll students who demonstrate outstanding academic and professional promise and whose background and experience will enhance the diversity of the student body, thereby enriching the Law School educational environment. Our students enter with experience ranging from years in the private sector, to service in the Peace Corps, Teach for America, military, government and more. This diversity creates a varied and stimulating intellectual atmosphere.

The following table provides information about 2013 applicants (2014 entering class). See also J.D. Admissions Statistics.

 

Incoming 1Ls (Class of 2017)

 

75th

50th

25th

LSAT

166

164

160

GPA

3.84

3.67

3.51

 

# of Applicants

2946

# of Offers

776

# of Matriculants

163

Incomings Transfers (Class of 2016)

 

75th

50th

25th

1L GPA

3.56

3.44

3.18

 

# of Applicants

18

 

 

For more detailed information see J.D. Admissions Statistics.

Tuition, Fees, Living Costs

Tuition and fees for the 2014-2015 academic year is $31,980 for residents and $45,021 for non-residents. Each year the University’s financial aid office estimates the additional amount of money needed for books and supplies, room and board, transportation, and personal expenses. These calculations reflect modest but adequate estimates of spending patterns for our students. The total cost of attendance for the 2014-15 academic year is $50,832 for residents and $63,864 for non-residents.

For more information see Estimate of Expenses for J.D. Students.

Financial Aid (Grants and Scholarships)

The information provided below is from the 2014 ABA Annual Questionnaire as reported.

 

Total

 

Number

Percentage

Total number of students

541

100%

Total number receiving grants

292

54%

Less than 1/2 tuition

267

49.4%

1/2 to full tuition

12

2.2%

Full tuition

0

0%

More than full tuition

13

2.4%

Grant Amounts (75th/Median/25th): $10,000/$8,000/$5,000

For additional information please see scholarships and financial aid.

Conditional Scholarships

The ABA defines a conditional scholarship as “any financial aid award, the retention of which is dependent upon the student maintaining a minimum grade point average or class standing, other than that ordinarily required to remain in good academic standing.”

At UW Law, students receiving merit- and/or need-based scholarships will automatically retain their incoming scholarship award each of their three years of instruction.

 

Number of Conditional Scholarships

% of Students Retaining Their Scholarship

Class of 2017

0

100

Class of 2016

0

100

Class of 2015

0

100

Enrollment Data

J.D. Enrollment and Ethnicity - all full-time, as reported to the ABA in October 2014

Men

Women

Total

First-Year

J.D. Degrees Awarded in 2014

Hispanic (any race)

14 (5.3%)

13 (5.2%)

27 (5.2%)

14 (8.6%)

18 (9.0%)

American Indian or Alaska Native

2 (0.8%)

0 (0.0%)

2 (0.4%)

2 (1.2%)

1 (0.5%)

Asian

20 (7.5%)

38 (15.2%)

58 (11.2%)

19 (11.7%)

13 (6.5%)

Black or African American

5 (1.9%)

8 (3.2%)

13 (2.5%)

5 (3.1%)

2 (1.1%)

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

0 (0.0%)

0 (0.0%)

0 (0.0%)

0 (0.0%)

1 (0.5%)

Two or More Races

16 (6.0%)

24 (9.6%)

40 (7.8%)

6 (3.7%)

18 (9.0%)

Subtotal (Minority)

57 (21.4%)

83 (33.2%)

140 (27.1%)

46 (28.2%)

53 (26.6%)

White or Caucasian

182 (68.4%)

146 (58.4%)

328 (63.6%)

102 (62.6%)

124 (62.3%)

Nonresident Alien

2 (0.8%)

7 (2.8%)

9 (1.7%)

1 (0.6%)

7 (3.5%)

Race/ Ethnicity Unknown

25 (9.4%)

14 (5.6%)

39 (7.6%)

14 (8.6%)

15 (7.5%)

Total

266 (51.6%)

250 (48.4%)

516 (100%)

163 (31.6%)

199 (100%)

Attrition/Graduation Rates

UW Law historically experiences very low attrition rates. In the past five years 2 students have been dismissed due to academic performance. One student from the incoming Class of 2013 transferred after their 1L year. Eighteen students transferred in as 2Ls in 2014. Graduation rates vary but range from 94-97% of the entering class.

Transfer of Credit Policy

UW Law will accept for transfer all of the credits earned during the transfer student’s first-year program. Semester-hour credits are converted to quarter-hour credits at a ratio of 1:1.5; e.g., 30 semester-hour credits will convert to 45 quarter-hour credits. Additional credits earned after the first-year are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Transfer students are expected to be in residence for a minimum of five quarters and 85 quarter-hour credits. Transfer students are eligible for graduation with honors based upon academic performance in the second and third years of law school at the University of Washington. The Law School does not have any articulation agreements with other institutions. For more information on transferring see Transfer and Non-Degree Admissions.

Faculty and Administrators

With a low student-to-faculty ratio, UW Law students have remarkable access to some of the brightest minds in the legal field. The following table provides information about faculty and administrators. See also profiles listed through the Faculty Directory.

Faculty and Administrators

Total

Men

Women

Minorities

Fall

Spring

Fall

Spring

Fall

Spring

Fall

Spring

Full-time

59

53

29

24

30

29

11

8

Deans, Librarians, and others who teach

8

5

2

1

6

4

1

1

Part-time

50

112

34

74

13

38

4

9

Total

117

170

65

99

52

71

16

18

 

Employment Outcomes

At UW Law, there are two separate centers to help students make connections with local attorneys and attain their professional goals. The Center for Professional Leadership and Development (CPLD) provides individualized coaching to students seeking careers in private law firms, the corporate sector, government agencies and judicial clerkships. The career coaches consist of a team of four professionals, including three attorneys and a seasoned recruiting professional. The CPLD team collectively has over 60 years of experience in the practice of law and the field of legal recruiting. The Center for Public Service Law (CPSL) provides individualized coaching to students seeking careers in non-profit or public interest organizations, private public interest firms, government agencies and as judicial clerks. The CPSL team consists of two attorneys who have a wealth of experience with careers in the public sector.

Both centers provide:

  • Coaching on how to identify interest areas and build professional relationships
  • Resume and cover letter writing skills
  • Mock interviews
  • Focused training events for students
  • Job-search techniques for the public and private sectors

Detailed Employment Summary for the Class of 2013

Detailed Employment Summary for the Class of 2012

Detailed Employment Summary for the Class of 2011

Detailed Employment Summary for the Class of 2010

Bar Passage Rates

The passage rates for graduates taking the Washington summer bar exam for the first time are:

July 2013: 93.5%
July 2012: 87%
July 2011: 83.8%
July 2010: 86%
July 2009: 87.5%
July 2008: 85.5%

Applicants who intend to practice law should be aware that admission to the bar in all states involves character, fitness and other qualifications. Applicants are encouraged to determine what those requirements are in the state(s) in which they intend to practice by consulting the website of the National Conference of Bar Examiners at http://www.ncbex.org/

Tuition Refund Policy

Students who withdraw may be entitled to a refund of all or a portion of the tuition and fees for a given quarter depending on the time of the quarter the withdrawal is completed. See f2.washington.edu/fm/sfs/tuition/forfeiture-refund

Curricular Offerings

The following table provides statistics about 2012-13 course offerings. For current course offerings and course descriptions, see the current course catalog.


Curriculum

Typical first-year section size

44

# of classroom course titles beyond first-year curriculum

195

# of upper division classroom course sections

Under 25

152

25-49

48

50-74

20

75-99

1

100+

0

# of positions available in simulation courses

493

# of simulation positions filled

493

# of seminar positions filled

829

# of positions available in faculty supervised law clinic courses

171

# of faculty supervised law clinic positions filled

159

# of field placement positions filled

158

# of students enrolled in independent study

193

# of students who participated in law journals

146

# of students who participated in interschool skills competitions

76

# of credit hours required to graduate

135

Additional information:

Is there typically a "small section" of the first-year class,
other than Legal Writing, taught by full-time faculty

Yes

If yes, typical size offered last year

27

Academic Calendar

We are on the quarter system. Students on the quarter system register for classes in three, ten-week sessions each year: Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Classes begin later in the fall (usually in late September) and classes end later in the year (after Memorial Day).

See the current academic calendar.

Academic Requirements

The J.D. Program begins in the Autumn Quarter only. To earn a J.D. degree, a student must satisfactorily complete at least 135 quarter hours of credits, including credits for all required courses. A student may earn up to 15 quarter credits towards the J.D. degree with advanced course work taken in other units of the University (see Concurrent Degree Programs); but in no case will Law School credit be given for courses taken before matriculation in the Law School. Students may also choose to focus their upper-level studies in one of eight concentration tracks or participate in an interdisciplinary certificate program.

The J.D. degree may be completed no sooner than 24 months and not longer than 84 months after a student commences study at UW Law or a law school from which the school has accepted transfer credit. Almost all students complete their studies in three academic years.

Progress towards graduation is monitored by the Associate Dean for Students. Students may take no more than 20 quarter hours of credit each quarter; the normal full-time load each quarter is 15 quarter hours of credit. Students may not be employed more than 20 hours per week in any week in which the student is enrolled in more than 12 quarter hour credits.

For more information on academic requirements see:

Library Resources

The Gallagher Law Library epitomizes the ABA Standard that "the law library shall be an active and responsive force within the life of the law school." Creative, well-trained, and highly educated professional librarians and library staff use technology to help and inform faculty, students, and staff as well as to provide service to the legal community. The presence of a large public academic law library promotes public access to justice for those who might otherwise go unheard, accelerates the scholarship of our expert faculty, and contributes to high quality education of our students.

Information and Library Resources

Total amount spent on library materials

$1,189,915

Study seating capacity inside the library

310

# of full-time equivalent professional librarians

13

Hours per week the library is open

84

# of full-time information technology staff

9

Wireless network throughout the building?

Yes

Facilities

William H. Gates Hall, named after William H. Gates, Sr., a 1950 graduate and father of the Microsoft co-founder, provides an inspiring learning environment with multi-functional classrooms and collaborative work space. Situated in a prime location on campus, just off of 'The Ave'--the heart of the University District, and just north of downtown Seattle, Gates Hall is convenient to all the amenities of student life as well as close to the Seattle legal community.

Because law students spend a great deal of time at the law school, William H. Gates Hall is equipped with many supportive features including lockers, student lounges, small group study rooms, bike lockers and racks, student kitchenette, shower facilities, computer tech support, and a remote learning center that allows law students with young children to participate in class while taking care of their children.

Allocation of Square Footage in Gates Hall:

Class and seminar rooms - 22,112
Clinical courses and programs - 4,038
Faculty offices - 8,308
Co-curricular and student activities - 11,261
Administrative and staff - 9,588
Library - 65,559
Lounges, storage, restrooms, hallways, etc. - 24,124
Total square footage - 144,990

Last updated 11/24/2014